What is AMA?

AMA is a publication style used by the American Medical Association. While there are several ways of citing sources when we write, AMA specifies these for use in journals published in the medical field, while APA is more typically used by those in the social sciences.

AMA differs from APA is several ways, so it is important to know which citation style your discipline requires.
Compared to APA, AMA uses:

• Reference lists that are numbered, not alphabetized, in order the sources are used in the text.
• In the text, AMA citations are numbered; there is no parenthetical author, year, or page number (APA uses (Smith, 2001), etc.)
• There are no periods after initials, nor is there an ampersand in the author section of each Reference list item (Jones RM, Smith PS vs Jones, R.M., & Smith, P.S.)
• The date appears after title, not immediately after author like it does in APA
• There is a space after the journal name and before the rest of the citation. Arch Ophthalmol. 2004;122(1):76.
• No spaces between year, volume, issue, page no. 2001;36(2):147-159.
• Journal titles abbreviated, not spelled out: Am J Med.
• The number of authors cited in the reference page is very different from APA.
• Duchin JS. Can biological terrorism save us from pertussis? Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2004;158(2):106-107.


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